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Music TopicI need to get serious again about the band of the day. I’m
tired of not doing it for so long that it’s more when I did it was an
odd exception. I have found one! It’s a local Atlanta band called
The Hiss. I read about them in
the Creative Loafing
and checked them out. They seem to fit in that broad category of The
Strokes, which is to say they are reminiscent of the same kind of simple
early 70’s rock. They don’t have a CD out, but do have MP3s available for
download.
Give it a listen.

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As an experiment in “digital piracy”, I decided to try downloading one
of the episodes of MST3K that I’ve never seen from the Digital Archive
Project. I’ve been working on this since Sunday, and I still don’t
have what I’m after. My goal was to get the episode and then burn it
to a VCD and watch it on my DVD player. First I had to download and
install eDonkey, an odd P2P client. It took over a day to get the file
down. Then I had an AVI of the movie. I downloaded VCDEasy, only to
find out that I cannot make it recognize my CD burner (despite being
one of the supported ones) and that the VDC requires the AVI to be in
MPEG-1 format. I downloaded TMPGEnc and started converting the AVI to
MP1. That was 10 hours ago, it still has 7 to go. I’m still not sure
that this thing will fit on the VCD when it is done. All in all, I’d
have to say that $15 would have been a bargain compared to the pain in
the ass this is. Which has been my point in all the discussions I’ve
ever been in on this subject – despite what it may seem like, piracy
is not fun. The folks who are willing to do this regularly have lots
of free time (which does not have a high dollar value) and kind of
enjoy all the crap that it takes. I really don’t believe that we are
in danger of consumers lining up to steal this stuff digitally. It’s
cheaper to buy it, when it is made available.

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I’ve made the decision for myself that I’m not watching the extensive
major network coverage of the 9/11 commemoration. As a group, I think
we are teetering on the hairy edge of grief turning to morbid
obsession.

I’ve been wondering a little why things are so radically
different between the Trade Center attacks vs. the Oklahoma City
bombing. The 150 or so people killed in Oklahoma City is probably a
similar percentage of the population as that of 3000 people is to
Manhattan. Why are Americans so much more worked up about this than we
were 6 years ago? Is it because New York captures more of our
attentions and hearts than Oklahoma? That the people killed in NYC
were more interesting than the people in Oklahoma? That we have an
“other” to blame and hate in this case? I just don’t understand it.