GSD

I’ve been listening to the various “Web 2.0” criticisms for a while now, both of the term and of the idea. I mentioned in my last podcast how I’m getting weary of people criticizing in situations where they could actually do the thing itself with not much more effort than complaining, exposing themselves for being lazy and all talk. These ideas are kind of coming together.

If you break it down to it’s heart, “Web 2.0” is about getting more things built faster for less money and that in turn allows us to actually do more better work. Is getting work done hype? How can it be? It’s about doing rather than talking, which explains why some pundits are turning against it. I’m guessing that the degree to which a pundit backlashes is inversely proportional to the rolled up height of their sleeves. I’ve never heard Jon Udell backlash at all, and his sleeves are rolled up to his neck.

Today I listened to the excerpt of the Bruce Sterling talk from eTech. In it, he said “If no one is accusing you of being all hype, you aren’t talking loud enough.” I like that outlook. I’ll add my corollary – “The best way to stick it to those who accuse you of being all hype is to make yourself indispensable in their lives. That’ll show them.”

From here forward, whenever I used to use “Web 2.0”, I’m going to use my own term: GSD. In analogy to David Allen’s “Getting Things Done”, this stand for “Getting Shit Done.” [Substitute “Stuff” if your gentle constitution requires it.] That’s where my head is at lately. Last fall I decided that rather than spend any more time criticizing the way podcast directories work, I built one that works according to my value system. Living well is the best revenge, and building something better is the best criticism. Less tongue in the air, more ass in the chair.

Those in the Pee Dee section of South Carolina, come join me Saturday for an afternoon of asses in chairs, and we can GSD.

9 Replies to “GSD”

  1. I had made rough plans to GSD Saturday. But other plans have required my ass (and the rest of me) to be out of town. Have fun!

  2. To me Web 2.0 means “NEW AND IMPROVED!”; just like we have seen on Tide boxes for the past 40 years. I love Dvorak’s take on it: “Web 2.0 Baloney” at pcmagazine.com.

  3. You’re in good company there, Dave. Michelangelo had a similar mantra: “criticize by creating.” (If anyone uncovers M’s podcast on the subject, please share.)

    And the “ass in the chair” bit cracked me up. Put my ass on the floor, so to speak.

  4. Speaking of web2.0 I’m designing an intro to web2.0 products (gmail, flickr etc) for an local evening college. Web2.0 products strike me as the nirvana for average punters (like my Mum) cool tools without maintenance. I liked them so much that I thought I should share the knowledge; hence I’m developing the course. Maybe you could share your favourite five web2.0 products.

  5. Lachlan,

    I’ll have to think about that. Flickr, AmigoFish (all humility aside) are the ones I use most frequently.

    Chris,

    That article was hilarious. I had no idea David Cross was from Atlanta until I read it. I’ve never seen Larry the Cable Guy for any longer than it takes to change the channel away from it. If you took off the hat and ripped flannel, I couldn’t pick the guy out of a lineup. I hadn’t considered that angle since I never spend one second thinking about him and his catch phrase.

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  7. “Less tongue in the air, more ass in the chair.”

    This made me laugh so much, it is now my motto.

    And Tilted Edge: I wouldn’t take anything Dvorak says too seriously. A bigger posseur doesn’t exist. If Jon Udell has his sleeves up to his neck, Dvorak wears oversided sweaters so he can stuff his hands in his sleeves a la Jennifer Love Hewitt.

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